I narrowed down thousands of science websites into my top 10 picks for kids ages 9-18! Check them out, then keep reading for my top 10 favorite science YouTube channels!

I narrowed down thousands of websites into my top 10 picks for kids ages 9-18! Check them out, then keep reading for my top 10 favorite science YouTube channels!

From science fair experiments ideas to complete online science courses, there’s never a shortage of fabulous resources out there for parents looking to encourage a love of science in kids! Whether you’re homeschooling, cyber schooling, or just looking for ways to supplement public school, these websites and YouTube channels will help!

Amazing Science Websites for Middle Grade Kids

Heads up: this post contains a couple of affiliate links within the descriptions of these fabulous science resources. If you click on these links and make a purchase, I will earn a tiny commission at no extra charge to you. Thanks so much for your support!

1.  Science Bob

I found Science Bob when I was looking for fun science experiments to do with my son in 7th grade. He has a lot of great ideas that are perfect for just about every grade. From super easy ideas like “blobs in a bottle” to more complicated experiments like “build a hover craft you can ride,” you’re guaranteed to find some great science fair winning ideas here!

2.  Animal Planet 

Kids can learn more about their favorite animals and enjoy the critter cams from zoos all around the world throughout hundreds of different videos. Get up close and personal with ants, decode tiger voices, and even learn ways to help protect local waterways.

3.  Bill Nye 

If you bookmark just one of these science resources for tweens, it’s this one. Bill Nye is the epitome of science fun. The site offers a ton of fascinating and “do try this at home” science experiments kids of all ages will love, most using simple household supplies. You can also learn about his best-selling books, including his middle-grade series, Jack and the Geniuses.

Bill Nye has a great show on Netflix that’s definitely worth watching.  I also love his Instagram feed. It’s a shame that uneducated people use his posts as a platform to spread their bizarre beliefs, though. Every single one has at least one person spouting off about how climate change isn’t real, or trying to convert the masses to their religion. 🙁

4. The Smithsonian Institute

This site offers a range of activities for elementary and middle school children, including tracking migratory birds and learning more about habitats. Along with interesting science articles for teens, you’ll also find some fascinating social studies, geography, and even some art projects and online games.

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How do we feed the animals at @smithsonianzoo? It's not that different than running a fine dining restaurant. The Zoo uses restaurant-grade produce. Early-morning deliveries include fresh fruits, vegetables, meat—and crickets. But we also have farm-to-table dining, and grow all our own hay, plus corn and mountains of bamboo to feed the pandas. Here, playing with your food is a good thing. Popcorn is popular for encouraging natural foraging behavior in apes. They spend hours picking through the grasses of their exhibits to find individual pieces, helping them stay mentally stimulated and engaged in their surroundings. Condiments can go a long way in jazzing up less-than-appetizing ingredients. Elephants enjoy a dash of hot sauce, and variety ensures that the more than 1,800 animals get a meal they'll love.

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The Smithsonian Instagram feed is also a fabulous resource for those times you just want bite-size science facts or need something a bit more recent and newsy. I love this little guy enjoying his watermelon! Cute, right?

5. Wonderopolis

Wonderopolis allows students to explore the world and answer their many questions about science. It also offers interesting exploratory activities, such as what you would pack for a trip into space. Sign up for their Wonder Daily newsletter to get new fun facts delivered to your email inbox every day.

6. National Geographic Kids

NatGeo Kids is one of my all-time favorite science websites for all ages. From fun online science games to crazy cool videos, tweens can spend hours just browsing and playing. They even have a Homework Help section. If your tweens love this site, grab them a subscription to National Geographic Kids magazine!

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Photo by @joelsartore | This adorable 12-week-old mink kit was found with its siblings when they were just a week old on a cold, rainy night in March when the den their mother had made in a piece of unused construction equipment was destroyed. An attempt to reunite the babies with their mother failed, so they were rescued by Nebraska Wildlife Rehab. When they first came into care, their eyes were closed, they weighed just a few ounces, and had very little hair. They had to be fed a specialized formula every two hours until they were stable, and then six times a day until they were weaned onto solid food. They are mischievous animals, which makes them a unique challenge to rehabilitate. They are fast and love to climb and swim and require extremely specialized housing with a variety of habitats that includes pools and dens. They also must eat on a very regular schedule — minks, like all weasels, have a high metabolism and aren't able to skip meals like other mammals. At Nebraska Wildlife Rehab this species makes up a small part of the over 6,000 animals they care for each year, but their unique and challenging personalities always make them a staff and volunteer favorite! American mink are a common animal near bodies of water throughout North America. Being semi-aquatic carnivores, they prey on fish, small rodents, reptiles, amphibians and birds. Although this species has a stable population, its cousin (and the only other mink species in the world), the European mink, is listed as critically endangered by the IUCN. @newildliferehab To see a photo of the other kits in the litter follow @JoelSartore.

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Like Smithsonian, the National Geographic Instagram feed is also filled with fascinating photos and current news. I couldn’t find one specific to NatGeo kids, but their main feed is all-age appropriate.  The photo above comes from a fantastic book called National Geographic The Photo Ark that is filled with stunning pictures of animals from all over the world. It’s a must for any animal lover’s collection! I got a copy for my birthday and my son is reading it with me.

7. Nova

Nova is a show that’s been on PBS ever since I was a kid, and remains one of the best resources for all things science. Start out on their main page, then check out their other specialized science websites and YouTube Channels, like Gross Science, which is exactly what it sounds like,  or The Nature of Reality, which focuses on physics.

They also have a great STEM resource for parents and teachers, complete with lesson plans, called NOVA Education.

8. Try Science

Try Science has dozens of experiments in areas such as chemistry, biology, math and engineering that can be done online and offline. You can take a virtual field trip to a museum and view animals via a critter cam. Students just have to click on one of the icons to start digging deeper.

9. CK-12

CK-12 isn’t specifically a science site, but it’s a must-have for any homeschooler or cyberschooler. If you do homeschool, you know it can be challenging to find really good FREE resources for creating lesson plans and what not.

The site has a ton of lesson resources, including textbooks, videos, interactive quizzes, and more for just about every topic. They also have a “cafe” where you can ask other parents and educators for help. The non-profit website is free for all, but they do accept donations.

10. How Stuff Works 

How Stuff Works covers a wide range of fascinating topics, such as UFOs, tornadoes, lunar exploration, and more. It’s a fascinating site students are sure to enjoy.

 

Top 10 Science YouTube Channels for Tweens & Teens

1. Smarter Every Day

Smarter Every Day does exactly that it sounds likes: makes you a little bit smarter every day! From super-slow-motion looks at how a lawnmower blade cuts grass to up-close peeks at how tattooing works, the channel is filled with unique science concepts. Warning: some of the videos are a little gross. They do label those, though.

2. Applied Science

Another fascinating YouTube science channel, this one has some pretty great videos to complement an electromagnetism unit, as well as plenty of other intriguing content. My favorite is the time-lapse video of crystals growing (above).

3. Because Science

Kyle Hill uses real science and math concepts to solve some of the strangest pop culture conundrums from games, movies, and more. Find out the Death Star’s other fatal flaw, or whether the Hulk really can jump into outer space! Learn how to beat a T-Rex, and so much more! This is probably my favorite YouTube science channel for tweens and teens.

4. Life Noggin

Don’t let the animated videos fool you, this isn’t a kiddie channel (although there’s nothing inappropriate for little ones, the science concepts are a little advanced for elementary school kiddos). Through simple yet fun animations, your kids will learn what would happen if they never left the pool, or what happens when organs grow on the outside of the body. The also answer the big questions, like what if you were allergic to water or what happens to your body if you just decide to stop showering forever.

5. Explorium

Explorium is neat if you’re looking for a more straight-forward science channel for teens. While the information is presented in a more “news-like” format, it’s still engaging and entertaining. My favorite, “Does Your Dog Love You?”, is above!

6. Khan Academy

You can’t really talk about educational YouTube Channels without mentioning Khan Academy. I’ve used their website quite a bit myself when I didn’t understand a science or math concept that my son’s cyber school was covering. Khan Academy isn’t strictly science, but they do cover just about every scientific concept that kids will ever learn in school.

7. Bill Nye

While his website is mentioned above, his YouTube Channel deserves its own special mention down here. Bill Nye is THE Science Guy. Just make sure you’re on his channel. Accept no substitutes!

8. Mike Likes Science

Formerly known as Coma Niddy, Mike Likes Science is actually run by a kid, making it fantastically engaging for other kids!  Find out if a dinosaur expert can spot a fake fossil, or why salt melts ice. Mike also entertains and educates through a series of rap songs about scientific concepts.

9. The Spangler Effect

The Steve Spangler Science team has 25 years of experience in making engaging science videos for kids, tweens, and teens! This is the perfect channel for finding fun science experiments ideas! Although I think I’m going to skip the Bacteria Growing project, thank you very much! My son doesn’t need any help growing bacteria. His cups and bowls left in his room for weeks does a perfect job of that all on their own.

10. The Backyard Scientist

The Backyard Scientist is neat because it answers some of the weirdest science questions that kids come up with and performs the experiments in a controlled setting so they can satisfy their curiosity without burning down your house.  There is an entire series on what happens when you pour molten aluminum on things, like watermelons or in the pool. I would definitely supervise those experiments, though! A lot of the videos are relatively short, too, making them ideal for kids with teeny attention spans! Most of the experiments are of the “don’t try this at home” variety.

 

Do you have any favorite online science resources for middle schoolers and teens? Share below!

 

 

 

 

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